Posts Tagged ‘March 2017’

Photo an Hour #44 ~ March 2017

March seems like an awfully long time ago now. I know, I know – that’s because it is. As is traditional, I have got rather behind with Photo an Hour posts, so here, at the end of June, is March’s day in photos.

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7am ~ Reading in bed, which is how most Photo an Hour days tend to start, for a large proportion of the participants!

8am ~ The view from the back of the house. If I remember rightly, I ummed and ahhed over the wording of the caption of this photo on Instagram, because anything with ‘back door’ in it just sends my mind to the gutter.

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9am ~ On the bus, as I so often am on a Saturday morning.

10am ~ Waiting in the opticians for my first eye test in years. This ticked off a 35 Before 35 list item!

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11am ~ Eye test quickly dispatched with, now in Paperchase. I didn’t buy a gift card, but I thought they were pretty.

12pm ~ I so rarely capture a photo dead on the stroke of the hour, so when I was able to, I thought I’d prove it with a photo of a clock!

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1pm ~ Rocking my best ever pin that I had received just prior to this day; I got it as a thank you for transcribing an episode of the podcast The West Wing Weekly, and I wear it with pride on my denim jacket.

2pm ~ Home, and doing a little housework.

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3pm ~ Reading again, with the woodburner on, because though it was March, it was cold. How weird to imagine wanting to introduce fire into your home right now!

4pm ~ Watching Only Connect, which I have spectacularly failed to keep up with in the last couple of series. I really should try harder, because I love it.

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5pm ~ My housemate Hannah had been to Hackney and brought back with her a fair amount of vegan food.

6pm ~ The last photo of the day, a) to keep an even number of photos for this blog post, and b) because this was where I sat and stayed for the rest of the evening. Flicking through Little White Lies, and watching (what else?) Pointless Celebrities.

This is the part where I say that I’m going to try and get up to date really quickly, so that I can join in with the roundup post on time for the next Photo an Hour. But you all know that this probably won’t happen, so what’s the point?

Photo an Hour is a lot of fun, with or without a roundup post, so if you haven’t done it before, please feel free to play next time! We don’t have a date confirmed for July’s fun, but if you sign up for a reminder email (in the sidebar on the right of this page), we’ll let you know in advance. More details about Photo an Hour can be found here, and my previous posts – all 43 of them – can be found here.

February & March 2017 Books

February & March

Not having been in the blogging swing of things lately, I missed a February round up for books, so I thought I’d combine two months in one!

The Frog Theory by Fiona Mordaunt *
You can read my full review of this book here; it’s a very short novel about three teenagers coming to terms with their difficult starts in life and navigating early adulthood. It’s not a book that I would honestly recommend, having found it to lose its way fairly spectacularly in the final third. It starts off exploring some interesting themes, but I wasn’t overly fond of it in the end.

Emmy & Oliver by Robin Benway
The premise of this YA book drew me in; a small child is abducted from by his father, who has recently separated from his mother. His next door neighbour, Emmy, was his best friend, but has had to learn to live in the shadow of his disappearance, until one day, when they are seventeen, he is found, and returns home. It’s an interesting idea, and the author neatly explores the idea that it’s not just Oliver who was affected when he went missing; the consequences are far-reaching. Ultimately though, it’s another enjoyable YA book that is fun while you’re reading it, but doesn’t blow your mind.

Last Bus to Woodstock by Colin Dexter
I picked this up in a charity shop a while ago, around the time that I first started watching Endeavour. Never one to just like a thing, I have to throw myself wholeheartedly into it. I have never actually watched Inspector Morse, so I thought I’d try and read the books first. This is the first in the series, and it’s fine, though very seventies in its outlook in terms of women and sexual violence. I enjoyed it as a crime mystery though, and at some point I will try and pick up the next in the series.

Everything Everything by Nicola Yoon
I have heard nothing but good things about Nicola Yoon’s novels, so thought it was about time I read one. Everything Everything is about a young woman, Maddie, who has such a severe immunodeficiency disease that she is unable to leave the house. Life has been plodding along in such a way for Maddie for almost the entirety of her life, until Olly moves in next door, and brings with him an exciting new possibility, as Maddie falls for him instantly. I liked this book a lot; though I guessed which way things were going, it’s beautifully written. The film is due out later in the year; having watched the trailer since reading the book, I’m not sure it’s necessarily going to capture the story in the way I want it to.

The Twins at St. Clare’s by Enid Blyton
I was a Malory Towers girl, and despite having at least some of the books on the family bookcase, I’ve never actually read any St. Clare’s books. Starting at the beginning of the series, I realised that Enid Blyton essentially wrote two different boarding school books without changing an awful lot. Many of the characters are just carbon copies of one another! But here we have twins, instead of one central character (Darrel Rivers 4eva), which lends a slightly different air to things. I don’t own all the books, so I’m reserving the rest of them at the library!

Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz
This was on my reservation list at the library for months and months, but it finally arrived, and it was totally worth the wait! The story is made up of two parts; a book editor receives a book called Magpie Murders to read, the latest in a series by the small publishing house’s star author. We get to read the manuscript in its entirety – almost. When she gets to the end, she realises that it’s unfinished, and this sets in motion an amateur investigation by this editor, as she starts to uncover mysteries surrounding the author and his life. I really enjoyed it – two mysteries for the price of one is never a hardship – though I was slightly put out by the denouement, which I won’t spoil here. The reveal of the mystery was fine, it was rather the way in which our central character ended the story that bothered me slightly, but it’s a small complaint, and multiple mentions of Simon Mayo and Radio 2 definitely helped up the star rating (if I had star ratings).

A Secret Garden by Katie Fforde *
I used to read a lot of Katie Fforde. Something about the middle England settings and the romances really appealed to me. My reading habits have changed somewhat since then, but when I spotted this one on Netgalley, I thought I’d give it a go. Nothing has changed; this is a story about two white women; one of whom is middle aged, one of whom is younger. The middle aged one is also middle class, working for a living but comfortable, and enjoying friendships with the local aristocracy. The younger one is poorer, but not destitute, and evidently has enough money to pursue her dream career that doesn’t pay a lot of money. The story mostly follows their romantic lives (both are straight), though there is a side story of the secret garden of the title. There’s nothing wrong with this kind of book, it’s just that I think the world has moved on, and I certainly have, from this very white, very straight, very middle class collection of characters.

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer
The only thing I have ever seen Amy Schumer do is Trainwreck, the film she wrote and starred in a couple of years ago. I’ve never seen her television series, and though I followed her on social media for a while, I had to unfollow because she started to get on my nerves. She’s a funny lady, and this is an interesting book; she covers everything from her father’s multiple sclerosis, and her former life as a shoplifter, to oral sex and her career as a stand up comedian. She’s eloquent and interesting, and she doesn’t make excuses for herself; she’s relentlessly honest, or certain appears to be. I didn’t laugh all that much with this book, there were a few asides that I felt were trying too hard to get me to laugh, and they didn’t quite come off. But I found it interesting, and with each ‘chapter’ simply an essay on a topic that she feels strongly about, it’s an easy read.

Books with an asterisk were provided by publishers for a review.

Books in 2017 – 11