January 2018 Books

January Reads

The first month of the year was a good one for me, in terms of reading. I made a conscious effort to set aside more time for reading, instead of going to bed and playing on my phone while I listen to podcasts. I love podcasts, but I love reading more, so it’s important to me that I make the time. My next step is to buy an alarm clock so that I can put my phone on the other side of the room, because when I charge it near my bed, the temptation to check Instagram becomes too great!

The Princess Diarist by Carrie Fisher
With The Last Jedi in cinemas just before Christmas, along with the one-year anniversary of Carrie Fisher’s death, the fact that I had never read any of her books was on my mind when I was browsing through Amazon at the 3 paperbacks for £10. I added this one in and got to reading it right away. I enjoyed it up to a point; there’s no denying that Fisher was a wonderful writer, able to construct a witty one-liner at any given opportunity, and unflinchingly honest about her relationship with Harrison Ford, which forms the backbone of the book. But I wish so much space hadn’t been given to the actual diary entries in the middle of the book; I much preferred her retrospective look at her brief relationship with Ford, and her time on the set of the first Star Wars film.

It Only Happens in the Movies by Holly Bourne
I’ve never read anything by Holly Bourne, but I know she’s a darling of the YA scene. I’m not a huge YA reader – not because I don’t like the books, just because I don’t often read them, but I thought I’d give this one a go. Maybe I started with the wrong book, but I wasn’t entirely won over. It’s the story of a teenager called Audrey (why do YA heroines always have to have unusual names?), who is trying to deal with her parents’ messy divorce, and her own painful break up at the same time, while starting a new part time job and doing her A-Levels and worrying about the future. And of course, there’s a new romance to think about as well. It’s not that I thought it was a bad book, I just think maybe I hadn’t managed my expectations. I just found the whole thing a little bit samey as many other YA romances that I’ve read. There’s even room for a gay best friend!

Seven Year Itch by Victoria Corby
When I was a bit younger, I devoured chick-lit novels. At the start of the 2000s, all of those books seemed the same; a mid-to-late twenties woman who was either very successful in her career, or very unsuccessful, who went to All Bar One after work, who met a man who she initially had some sort of conflict with but with whom she ended up living happily ever after. This was one of those books, and I read it back then, and for some reason, certain sections have lodged themselves in my memory, but the title and author had escaped me. One night last month I was awake in the middle of the night, had a flash of inspiration, and downloaded the Kindle Unlimited version of it. It’s not a great book, but the story of a property scandal in the countryside is mildly entertaining, and it’s not hard to see how it could be re-written for 2018 if you take out some of the questionable gender politics and add in some slightly diverse characters (but no need to go overboard, Katie Fforde manages to write book after book about straight, white, middle class people).

Force of Nature by Jane Harper*
I have a full review of Force of Nature coming soon, so I won’t say too much here. But it’s a follow up to Jane Harper’s debut novel The Dry, which I read and reviewed at the very start of 2017. The case has changed completely, but the common thread is Aaron Falk, the police officer in The Dry who had returned to his hometown and found himself caught up in a murder case. As a federal police officer in the financial crimes department, Falk surprisingly once again finds himself caught up in an unusual case, as this time he ends up investigating after one of his key witnesses in an embezzlement case goes missing on a staff training course in a dense forest. Suffice to say, I really loved this book, and whizzed through it to find out what had happened and how it had happened. Full review coming next week!

Meet Cute by Various Authors
A short story anthology by various YA authors, Meet Cute features tales of ‘how they met’. There’s two teenage girls who meet after one lodges a customer service complaint via Twitter, and the other does everything she can to help her. There’s a futuristic story about the Department of Love, reminiscent of Eternal Sunshine, who perform relationship autopsies and the provide the chance to go back and try again. There are lots of lovely stories, some more engaging than others, and they are super diverse and inclusive (though off the top of my head I can’t remember if there are any male-male stories), and it was really enjoyable to listen to.

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin
This is a novel that was on just about every ‘Books to look forward to in 2018’ list, I was lucky enough to be offered it as a review copy. It follows four siblings who go together to see a psychic when they are children in 1960s New York; they are each told the date on which they will die, and the rest of the novel branches off in four directions as they live their lives under the shadow of the prediction. I will be reviewing this one in full closer to the publication date next month, but for now I’ll just say that I really liked it, and I’ve already recommended it to everyone I know!

Books read so far in 2018 – 6