Posts Tagged ‘Book Blog Tour’

Book Blog Tour ~ Spandex and the City by Jenny T Colgan

Holly9780356505442 (1) Phillips is a mild-mannered publicist, perpetually unlucky in love. When the handsome stranger who flings her over his shoulder turns out to be ‘Ultimate Man’, a superpowered hero, Holly is thrust into the limelight, earning her fifteen minutes of fame, and putting her into the path of the city’s most famous villain.

There’s no denying that the inclusion of a superhero as a romantic interest for this modern fiction novel errs a little bit on the silly side. As soon as you know that you are dealing with a superhero in a purple spandex suit, you know what to expect really.

And this book delivers on that, but manages to go a little bit further, and ends up not being the typical romance novel that you first imagine it will be. Holly is a relatable heroine; interesting and modern, but with enough flaws that you can recognise yourself (or yourself in your late twenties) in her. She isn’t entirely sure where she is going at the beginning of the novel, but as things start to take a turn, she discovers more about who she is and what she wants.

Positing this as a superhero story is possibly taking it too far, as ultimately it is a story about a boy and a girl, but there are enough twists and turns to make it an enjoyable one. Most importantly, it doesn’t take itself too seriously, allowing you to grab on and go along for the ride!

Spandex and the City by Jenny T. Colgan
First published: May 2016
ISBN: 9780356505442
Orbit Books
Provided by publisher

Book Blog Tour ~ English Animals by Laura Kaye

english-animals-jacketMirka is 19, Slovakian, and starting a new job at an English country house. Her employers, Sophie and Richard, are upper-middle class, with no children, and Mirka is unsure at first what her role is to be. She becomes a live-in assistant, helping Richard with his fledgling taxidermy business, and providing domestic support to Sophie. The lines are blurred; is she domestic help, business employee, friend?

Mirka’s ability as a taxidermist soon surpasses Richard’s; for him it is another business venture to try and keep afloat amidst the troubles of keeping a large house running. But Mirka, though reluctant at first, finds an art in it; the English animals that she preserves become a way of expressing herself, and taking inspiration from old fashioned anthropomorphic taxidermy, creates a name for herself, eventually being featured in a magazine.

 

The taxidermy is expertly described, down to the smallest detail; if Laura Kaye has no experience of the craft herself then she has certainly done her research. But it provides a mere backdrop to the more important English Animals that are at work here; Richard, Sophie, and the supporting players throughout the story.

Mirka finds Richard an easy man to like when he is being warm, generous and funny; she shares a close friendship with him that includes trips to the pub and hunting expeditions (even if Mirka does ultimately balk at the idea of shooting an animal).

Sophie, the lady of the house, is an enigmatic, privileged woman who is used to having what she wants; though what she wants more than anything is the one thing she can’t seem to have – a baby. Mirka struggles at times to understand Sophie’s motivations, accusing her of seeing everything as a toy to play with. Sophie admits as much herself; she just wants to feel wanted.

The entrance of Mirka, an Eastern European, into a middle England village in this day and age certainly reflects a Brexit state of mind; in groundskeeper David we get a man who almost certainly would have voted leave, threatening Mirka and making it clear that he thinks she should go back to where she comes from. Sophie’s father, though slightly more caricatured than David, has similar views on foreigners, failing to recognise the irony in having a house in France that he lives in year-round.

The quirkiness of the English middle classes; isolated in their rural communities, is emphasised by the fact that the entire story is told from the perspective of Mirka, whose first language is not English. She has no handle on idioms, unable to help Sophie with the cryptic crossword until something finally clicks towards the end of the novel. Mirka’s sense of disorientation at this previously unknown culture helps us to see these people through her eyes. Her discomfort at Richard’s birthday party – a bad taste fancy dress party where people dress as dictators, pregnant nuns and child molestors – is palpable, and in stark contrast to another party she attends with some hipster types in East London, where she feels at ease, with her ‘own tribe.’

This really is an exceptional piece of work, particularly given that is a debut novel. It’s easy to read without lacking in scope, and the plot drives the momentum of the story beautifully. Laura Kaye is most certainly a novelist with a bright future.

English Animals by Laura Kaye
First published: January 2016
ISBN: 9781408709450
Little Brown
Provided by publisher

 

Book Blog Tour ~ The Dry by Jane Harper

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The worst drought to hit Australia in a century is already causing tensions to run high in Kiewarra, a small farming town that hasn’t seen rain for two years. Things become unbearable when a local family is murdered, and the only suspect is Luke, husband and father, who appears to have killed himself after gunning down his wife and son.

Luke’s childhood friend Aaron Falk is the protagonist who leads the reader through the story. As a police officer himself, he is drawn into the investigation into the family’s deaths, and his presence in his childhood home forces him to confront some of the lies and secrets that caused him to leave in the first place.

Through the clever use of flashbacks, the reader learns that Aaron and his father were implicated in the death of a teenage girl decades earlier, after she drowned and left a note showing only one word – their surname. This old mystery runs alongside the current investigation into the murders of the Hadlers, and though Aaron would rather leave the past in the past, secrets refuse to stay buried, and the two cases become intertwined.

The crime at the centre of the novel is a strong one, and one that will keep readers guessing. The oppressive feeling of returning to a place long consigned to memory is compounded by the heat of the weather; Aaron is struggling with his return to a community that effectively ran him out of town, and this feeling is emphasised by the brutality of the drought conditions. There is no respite from the weather, or the lack of weather as far as rain is concerned, and the pressure mounts throughout the novel as it becomes clear that this community is on the brink of total devastation.

The Dry is my first read of 2017, and it was a pleasure to read it. The film rights have already been acquired, and it’s obvious that in the right hands, this could be adapted to a taut and atmospheric crime thriller.

Friday

Book Blog Tour ~ Because of You by Hélene Fermont

exclusive-because-of-you-by-helene-fermont-extract-1Because of You tells the story of Hannah, a young woman at the beginning of her adult life at the start of the book, following her through her life for 36 years. A Swedish Jew, she spends time in London before returning to Sweden for her career, and the reader is taken along on her journey.

Of course, it’s a story of love and relationships, primarily with two men in Hannah’s life, but also with her friends, both old and new, her parents, brother and grandmother, and her colleagues. Hannah’s life in London is a whirlwind of social engagements – she is a regular at various clubs that have a distinctive late 70s feel, which is where she meets Mark – an attractive and charismatic man about whom her friends warn her, but whom she can’t help falling for. The second man in her life is Ben, for whom Hannah is his soulmate, he falls deeply in love with her immediately, but is forced to wait while she realises that Mark is not the man for her.

Some of my very favourite stories are ones which span decades in the life of characters, and the same is true here. It was a pleasure to follow Hannah on her journey and get to know her, both celebrating in her triumphs and despairing in her ill-advised decisions. She’s an honest and kind character who begins the novel a little innocent, and by necessity, has to become a little wiser to the world, but this does nothing to affect the reader’s fondness for her, and ultimately, you just want her to be happy.

The author’s own experiences have clearly come to bear on this novel, as London and Sweden throughout the different eras are well-realised. In the end, it’s a great story, and one that had me racing through it to find out what the ending would be.

Because of You by Hélene Fermont
First published: August 2016
ISBN: 9780995490703
Fridhern Publishing
Review copy provided by Bookollective

Book Blog Tour ~ The Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena

The Couple Next DoorWhen their babysitter cancels, Anne and Marco decide to leave baby Cora at home while they go next door for a dinner party. Anne is uncomfortable, but Marco assures her that they will take a baby monitor, and check on her every half an hour; there’s nothing that can possibly go wrong. But Cora is missing when they arrive home, and the resulting events send the family into turmoil.

This is a story that has obvious similarities to real-world events; a child is left alone at home and subsequently disappears, with suspicion and public disapproval being instantly heaped upon the parents. But though it seems as though this is a story that is going to deal with the idea of parents being publicly shamed by their poor decision, it turns quite quickly into a thriller dealing with the two main characters of Anne and Marco, the parents of baby Cora.

Anne is suffering with post-partum depression, and this causes her to doubt her own memories of the evening in question. She’s quite sure that she hasn’t harmed her baby, but she can’t be entirely certain. Though this is a story written in the third person, we are party to everything that both Anne and Marco are thinking; we know that Anne loves her baby and would never harm her, but as the people around her, including the police, question her state of mind, she starts to doubt herself.

We are also intermittently given access to the thoughts of the police detective, Rasbach, as he tries to put everything into place to discover the whereabouts of the baby. This isn’t a crime thriller, so his isn’t the most important voice in the story, but knowing what his suspicions are allows the reader to try and make their own judgements. With Anne’s mental health issues, and the carefully placed reasons for initially suspecting Marco, we aren’t sure of our footing with these characters, and how reliable they are as third-person narrators.

There are enough twists and turns in the story to keep the reader guessing, and though I just about guessed how things were going to conclude with regards to the missing baby, I was still kept guessing, and the end certainly packed a punch.

Lapena didn’t feel the need to create characters who were entirely likable; it was easy to sympathise with them as they dealt with the trauma of having their baby kidnapped, but learning about them throughout the investigation allowed them to be presented as fully rounded characters, and not always the nicest people.

I read this book during my lunchtimes, and putting it down to go back to work was tough! It grabbed my attention and kept it, as I was so eager to find out what had happened to the baby, and to see if it was going to be possible for this family to put themselves back together.

This is a worthy addition to the ‘grip lit’ genre, with a fresh take on it; not here do we have a female protagonist at the centre of a psychological thriller, but a family, making it a domestic thriller, and the pace of the book means that once it gets you within its grips (within pages if you’re anything like me), you’ll find it hard to put it down until you’re finished.

The Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena
First published: 14th July 2016
ISBN: 9780593077382
Transworld
Review copy provided by publisher