August & September 2018 Book

Aug-Sept-Books

 

Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret by Judy Blume

I truly believe that I’ll never stop loving Judy Blume, even reading these books thirty or more years after they’ve been published, and even when it’s my fifth or sixth re-read. In the case of Are You There God? It’s Me Margaret, this was actually the first time that I’d read it. As ever, the stories of friendship in Blume’s books are what keep drawing me back in; though I love the angst of teenage relationships, it’s the stories of friendship between young women that keep me coming back for more! This book is a bit of a mix of the two; Margaret is an eleven-year old who moves from the city to the suburbs, and the main focus of the story is her questions about religion. She’s also dealing with the usual thing a girl of her age faces – periods, hormones, first kisses. It’s not my favourite Blume, but I’m glad to have added it to the read list!

Here’s to You Rachel Robinson by Judy Blume

Talking of favourite Blumes – here we are (though I can never work out which is my actual favourite, this or its predecessor, Just As Long As We’re Together.) Rachel Robinson is a high-achiever at school, top of her class, doing lot of extra-curricular activities, but her home life is in disarray, with the return of her brother, the troubled Charles. Again, there’s a love interest (the swoon-worthy Jeremy Dragon, and a crush on a much older guy), but the focus is much more on Rachel’s friendships with Stephanie and Alison, and how she is dealing with the pressures of school and family. In the first in a new blog series with which I will inevitably never continue, I wrote a letter to the grown up Rachel.

Leah on the Offbeat by Becky Albertalli

It took me a while to get to this since it was released earlier this year, but I’m nothing if not perpetually behind the popular culture curve. I read Love, Simon (originally Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda) earlier in the year, having watched the film, and I just wanted to spend more time with this group of kids who were really good company. So I was more than happy that there was an already-released sequel for me to get to. This one is the story of Simon’s friend Leah; a bisexual, socially uncomfortable teenager who takes refuge in her drums. Much like Love, Simon, it’s just a good high school story, and I do love a good high school story. I’d be interested to see if this one makes it to film – bisexual teenage girls aren’t known for their visibility in the Hollywood mainstream!

The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon

Read my full review of The Incendiaries.

Floored by Eleanor Wood, Holly Bourne, Lisa Williamson, Melinda Salisbury, Non Pratt, Sara Barnard and Tanya Byrne

Read my full review of Floored.

Murder Most Unladylike by Robin Stevens

Read my full review of Murder Most Unladylike.

The Early Birds by Laurie Graham

Yet another sequel on this month’s list; this book follows The Future Homemakers of America, which I read last year, and loved. I can’t say that I felt quite so enamoured about The Early Birds. While it was great to catch up with characters that we first meet in the 1950s in the original book, there was none of the magic from the first book for me. To begin with, one of the things I loved the most about the first book was the large expanse of years, following the same characters and their families through decades. This book doesn’t do that, we’re limited to a few short years, and the majority of the story takes in the 2001 New York terror attacks. For me, the story gets totally bogged down with 9/11 conspiracy theories, and I just have no interest in that, so it wasn’t a storyline that appealed to me. I liked catching up with the characters, but there just wasn’t a spark for me, so I was a little disappointed.

Books so far in 2018 – 39