I was recently offered the chance to read and review The Lost Man by Jane Harper. I received a copy of the book from the publishers, in exchange for a review.

Synopsis

Three brothers. One Death. No Answers. 

He had started to remove his clothes as logic had deserted him, and his skin was cracked. Whatever had been going through Cameron’s mind when he was alive, he didn’t look peaceful in death.

Two brothers meet at the border of their vast cattle properties under the unrelenting sun of Outback Queensland. They are at the Stockman’s Grave, a landmark so old, no one can remember who is buried there. But today, the scant shadow it casts was the last hope for their middle brother, Cameron. The Bright family’s quiet existence is thrown into grief and anguish. Something had been troubling Cameron. Did he lose hope and walk to his death? Because if he didn’t, the isolation of the outback leaves few suspects… 

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I’ve read and reviewed both of Jane Harper’s previous novels, The Dry, and Force of Nature. Both of those stories featured the same police officer, investigating two different cases. When I was offered the chance to review this one, I assumed that it was going to be the third in that series, so I was surprised when I discovered that it was a standalone story, though I needn’t have worried, because I think this was Harper’s best book yet.

Like her previous two novels, The Lost Man is set in the Australian outback, and once again, the location is hugely important to both the story and the atmosphere. Nathan, the oldest of three brothers, meets his youngest brother Bub, at the Stockman’s Grave, a local landmark, where their other brother, Cameron, has been found dead. Nathan lives apart from his family, at the next farm along, which happens to be hundreds of kilometres away. Everyone is isolated by the geography of the region, with Nathan having lived in exile on his own farm due to events from a decade previously.

The mystery of Cameron’s death is that he was used to life in these unrelenting surroundings, so it’s extremely unlikely that he would have left his vehicle without the necessary provisions. This leads police to believe that he must have taken his own life, but Nathan isn’t so sure, and begins his own investigations into his brother’s death.

Everything we learn about the family comes through Nathan’s eyes, who, having kept his distance, is finding out things that even he didn’t know. The story is revealed slowly and deliberately; this is a real slow-burn of a book, with family secrets buried deep.

Once again, as with her other two novels, I was blown away by Harper’s ability with both character and plot. The tension of the story, building to a climax with the reveal of what happened, and why it happened, grows to a point where I literally could not put this book down. The characters are, for the most part, people who I love spending time with, and as with Aaron Falk from Harper’s first two books, I found myself missing Nathan once he was gone.

Everywhere I look, I see that I’m not alone in my love for Jane Harper’s incredible stories, and I’m also not alone in loving each new book a little more than the last. With a trajectory like this, I really cannot wait to see what comes next!

The Lost Man by Jane Harper
Publication Date: 7th February 2019
Little Brown
Provided by publisher