Book Review ~ House of Glass by Susan Fletcher

I was recently offered the chance to read and review House of Glass, published today by Susan Fletcher. I received a copy of the book from the publishers, in exchange for a review.

Synopsis of House of Glass

June 1914 and a young woman – Clara Waterfield – is summoned to a large stone house in Gloucestershire. Her task: to fill a greenhouse with exotic plants from Kew Gardens, to create a private paradise for the owner of Shadowbrook. Yet, on arrival, Clara hears rumours: something is wrong with this quiet, wisteria-covered house. Its gardens are filled with foxgloves, hydrangea and roses; it has lily-ponds, a croquet lawn – and the marvellous new glasshouse awaits her. But the house itself feels unloved. Its rooms are shuttered, or empty. The owner is mostly absent; the housekeeper seems afraid. And soon, Clara understands her fear: for something – or someone – is walking through the house at night. In the height of summer, she finds herself drawn deeper into Shadowbrook’s dark interior – and into the secrets that violently haunt this house. Nothing is quite what it seems.

 

House of Glass Susan Fletcher

Quite simply, House of Glass is a beautiful novel. It’s been a while since I read anything as evocative as this story of a young woman living in a strange house. The beauty of it is that it’s part mystery, part horror, part historical fiction, and part romance, and all the different strands are woven together beautifully.

Our main character, Clara, is a compelling woman; she has spent her entire childhood ensconced in her family home, never leaving for fear of breaking a bone due to a medical condition called Osteogenesis Imperfecta. Her bones are fragile, and rather than risk serious injury or death, her parents decide that the best course of action is to keep her safe indoors, where she retreats into books, gaining all of her knowledge from encyclopedias and reference books. Clara is exceptionally well-read, but has none of the life experience that she needs, and it isn’t until the death of her mother that she decides to really venture out. In her grief, she makes friends with a gardener from Kew Gardens, which in turns leads to her taking a job at Shadowbrook, working in the glass house of the title.

To give too much detail about the plot would be to spoil the gradual way in which the story unfolds, but it’s an engaging read that I think will pull in even the most jaded of readers. Clara’s journey, from someone with so much conviction in her beliefs, through a period of doubt and questioning, is wonderful to be a part of. She’s a woman who feels almost out of time; her necessary confinement means that she hasn’t grown up around the people who would seek, in 1918, to tell woman that they have a specific place in the world, and they aren’t expected to make their opinions known.

Any book that explores grief, particularly when concerned with the loss of a mother, is one that will speak to me, and when it’s done well, I can completely recognise myself and my own grief in it. One of my favourite quotes from the book conveys this entirely:

“It never goes,” he said. “You survive it – you do. But it is a different life to the one you had before.”

House of Glass by Susan Fletcher
Publication Date: 1st November 2018
Virago
Provided by publisher

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