June 2018 Books

June-2018-Books

P.S. I Still Love You by Jenny Han
I mentioned in my last books roundup that I had picked up the first two books in this series in a charity shop, and I’m so glad I did, because as soon as I had finished reading To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, I was able to crack straight on with the next in the series! Following the events of the first novel, in which Lara Jean’s love letters to all the boys she loved were posted without her knowledge, things have settled down a little, and Lara Jean is in a proper relationship with one of the boys, Peter. However, things are still complicated with Peter’s ex, Genevieve, and get even further confused when John Ambrose McLaren, one of the letter recipients, arrives back on the scene and cause Lara Jean to question her feelings.

Things are lot more teenage-angsty in this story; one of the reasons I loved the first book was that the relationships of the three sisters was an important part of the story, and that is less the case here. But it’s still a hugely enjoyable YA romance, and now I have to get the last in the series to see how it all turns out.

Love and Ruin by Paula McLain
I reviewed Love and Ruin as part of a blog tour, you can read my full review here. The long and short of it is that this is the story of Martha Gellhorn, celebrated war correspondent whose career spanned six decades. The period covered in this novel coincides with her marriage to one of the most famous American writers of the 20th Century, Ernest Hemingway. It’s a fine line to tread between focusing solely on her time as the third of Hemingway’s four wives, and portraying her as what she was; a female war writer at a time when women weren’t expected to be amongst the conflict. I really loved this story; McLain conjured up the hazy paradise of Cuba in the 30s as wonderfully as she evoked the terrifying scenes of war in Spain and France.

The Wives by Lauren Weisberger
My full review of The Wives goes into detail about my problems with the book; it’s not offensive, and it’s an enjoyable enough read, but I feel as though as a reader, I’ve moved on a lot since when I read The Devil Wears Prada, of which this is a sequel. I didn’t actually realise it was a sequel, until I noticed Miranda Priestly’s name being mentioned, and then later remembered that Emily was the name of a character in that book, and she’s one of our main characters here. As I mentioned in my review, I want and need to read much more diversely, and books like this, that feel like totally empty calories, are a bit of a waste of my reading time. of which I don’t have that much. My feelings a couple of weeks after reading it are actually seeming a lot harsher than they did when I finished it – I wanted to get to the end, and finish off the story, and in that respect, it was enjoyable enough. But I won’t be troubling myself to read any more in the series if they come along.

The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and Robert Hack, parts 3 & 4
I’ve decided to lump these two books into one, because in all honesty, I probably should have put all eight issues in one in the first place – they are kind of hard to review individually! I am really enjoying the story though; it’s delightfully dark, and I can’t wait to see how it’s adapted for television. I’m going to resist too much of a review/plot synopsis until I have read all eight instalments!

You Think It, I’ll Say It by Curtis Sittenfeld
Whenever I’m asked what my favourite book is, I say American Wife by Curtis Sittenfeld. It’s been ten years since it was published, and probably seven years since I last read it (I should probably remedy that), but I just remember loving it so much. And now a new release by Sittenfeld is something to be celebrated, though this collection of short stories has been out for a while, and I’ve only just managed to get my hands on it to read. I’m not really clever enough to suggest why she’s so awesome, but all I know is that I love her characters, who always feel so intensely real to me, and when it’s time to walk away from them, at the end of a book, I always feel a sense of loss.

The fact that she manages to do this with short stories is just further evidence of her genius. It’s been a couple of weeks since I read these stories, but the people are still with me. I’m still thinking about the young journalist who leaves her breastfeeding baby behind while she heads to interview a young startlet, and about the high-flying lawyer who happens upon her old high school enemy on her honeymoon and can’t get past the idea of exacting petty revenge. These women (and occasionally, men), are all totally individual and distinct characters, who live and breathe in the pages of the book.

Books so far in 2018 – 26

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