May 2018 Books

May-2018-Books

Love Simon by Becky Albertalli

When it comes to YA, I am just so far behind. I mean, I’m 35, I don’t think it’s the most important thing in the world for me to read all the latest books as soon as they come out, but Instagram can give you a pretty big inferiority complex when it comes to reading! Love Simon, or Simon vs the Homosapiens Agenda has been on my radar for ages, but then the film started to pop up everywhere, and I wanted to read it before I saw it. I failed at this, but even reading it after I saw the film was a joy.

For anyone who doesn’t know, the story is quite a simple one; Simon is a teenager with a big secret – he’s gay. Simon exchanges emails with Blue, another gay teenager at his school, and they talk about everything without knowing exactly who the other one is. The book is a quite straightforward high school YA book, but it’s full of charm and wit, and characters who you just want to be around forever. I want Simon and his group of friends to be my friends; they are cool, and fun, and decent people for the most part. I loved the book, and then I loved the film, and now I have to read Leah on the Offbeat so I can get a further fix of these people.

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina #1 by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, Robert Hack and Jack Morelli

The second in the series that I started in April, this moves the story on and focuses on Madam Satan, who is the big bad for this series. She’s going to be played by Madam Satan in the new Netflix series, and I am so excited, because Michelle Gomez is godlike to me due to her portrayal of Sue White in Green Wing. I am yet to read the next in the series, because I moved on to other things, but given that they take me no time at all to read, I should probably get on with it and find out what happens!

First Term at Trebizon by Anne Digby

I received this book as a gift in my Send Someone Awesome a Book swap that I took part in earlier in the year. Some of the wonderfully bookish people that I follow on Instagram (Alex at Odd Socks Alex and Gwen at Shutters and Letters, specifically) came up with the idea of SSAAB Day when they realised that many people don’t have random days of the year on which they are plied with gifts (outside of their birthdays), and because books are so great, wouldn’t it be wonderful to send a random person a book to celebrate their being awesome. This kind of thing was made for the likes of me, and I packaged up my books and sent them off, and received three perfect books to read.

The lady who sent my books (@delightfuldevon) clearly did her research, as I got two boarding school books, and I haven’t read either of them before! I love Malory Towers, so was excited to start the Trebizon series with this one. It’s more or less the same sort of story as Malory Towers, though it’s a little more up to date, being set in the 70s (!). The cast of characters are equally as engaging, with girls to root for and girls to hate, and I’ve passed it on to my niece who appears to be turning into a voracious reader as well. I just need to collect the rest of the series now!

Movie Geek: The Den of Geek Guide to the Movieverse by Simon Brew

I’ve had this on my Kindle for a long time, and I’ve been dipping in and out of it ever since I downloaded it. If you’re a fan of the Den of Geek website, you’ll know that it’s a well-written, well-researched resource for films, television, games, comics, and entertainment in general. Simon Brew, the editor of the website, has ensured that this book has a similar ethos; it’s full of interesting tidbits about the movie world, some of which I’d heard before, and some of which was news to me. It’s the right mix of entertainment, analysis and sheer movie geekiness.

Girl in Snow by Danya Kukafka 

The now sadly defunct Radio 2 Book Club first alerted me to Girl in Snow, when its author, Danya Kukafka, was on Simon Mayo’s show to talk about her debut novel. It’s the story of a murder in a small Colorado town; popular teenager Lucinda is killed, and the story is told from three perspectives. There’s Cameron, a neighbour of Lucinda’s who had an obsession with her; Jade, her childhood friend whose own life couldn’t be further removed from Lucinda’s, and Russ, one of the police officers on the case. It’s a very slow moving book; the action only seems to take place over the course of a week or so, but it’s more about the secret and inner obsessions of the main characters than about the murder itself. We aren’t invited to learn too much about Lucinda, aside from how her life, and death, have impacted our three narrators. While the action isn’t scintillating, the prose is beautiful, and it wasn’t a story that I wanted to gallop through to find out who the perpetrator was; I was more than content to read it slowly and enjoy it.

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before by Jenny Han

Although I’m not a YA superfan, I do like to dabble, particularly in American YA, and particularly in the summer (I think it’s nostalgia for my teenage years, though I’m not really sure where the summer bit comes in). Somehow these books by Jenny Han (there are four in the series), had completely passed me by; they were on my radar, without me ever having picked them up before, or even knowing what they were about. When I spotted the first two in a charity shop, I grabbed them, and devoured them.

The heroine of our story is Lara Jean Song Covey, a Korean-American teenager who lives with her dad and two sisters. It’s a romance, through and through, with the central tenet being that Lara Jean had written a number of never-intended-to-be-posted love letters to all the boys that she loved before, only to find that one day, out of the blue, someone puts them in the post, and all the boys on whom she had previously had crushes are suddenly informed about her until-then secret love.

There’s not a whole lot of stuff going on here that is unexpected or different from the general YA literature that is out there, especially when it comes to the romance side of things, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. What I liked the most was Lara Jean’s relationships with her sisters; her older sister Margot, who leaves for university at the start of the story, and Kitty, her younger sister. Kitty is only 10, and as the Covey’s mother died when they were young, Margot and Lara Jean are like the mothers Kitty never knew. With one of Lara Jean’s crushes being her sister Margot’s former boyfriend Josh, another level is added to that relationship, and all of this comes together to make an engaging and interesting family dynamic.

Books so far in 2018 – 21

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