Writing today’s BEDM post has proved problematic for a couple of reasons. Firstly, I’ve been wracking my brains all day, struggling to come up with a something (anything!) to write about. And now, just as I sat down to write it, my laptop decided not to play ball. So I’m writing this on my phone, apologies in advance for any formatting anomalies!

I think my main issue with today’s prompt is that I don’t really receive an awful lot of advice, good or bad. There are a few people in my life who like to provide unsolicited advice, but I think we’ve all got those people around us, haven’t we?

So, having thought about it for a while, I started to realise that most of the advice that comes my way is from medical professionals. I don’t go to see the doctor all that often, but there have been three occasions in the past when I have, and the advice I’ve received hasn’t been all that helpful. I’m sorry if any of this is over sharing!

  • Ever since I started my periods, I’ve had a terrible time of it. I’m talking severe bouts of vomiting, every half an hour or so, for about twelve hours, coupled with the usual stomach cramps. My doctor, a middle aged man, seemed frankly reluctant to do much about helping me. I always got the feeling that he didn’t really like dealing with women and their personal problems. He wouldn’t put me on the contraceptive pill, despite the fact that it was clear that it would help me. Looking back, it’s ludicrous. I should have been more assertive and demanded to see another doctor!
  • When I got a bit older, and was obviously deemed old enough to take the pill, I did. Although it helped, it wasn’t perfect and I still suffered (and still do suffer) from the vomiting. A female doctor, much preferable to the old fart from before, put me on some anti-sickness tablets. All well and good, but the first time I took them, I was at work, and I had a very strange reaction to them. It’s hard to describe, but I felt as though my body was tilting to one side, and I had no control over it. I didn’t actually realise it was anything to do with the tablets, until I returned to the doctor and she informed it was a common side effect, and un-prescribed them immediately.
  • Finally, when I was on my ‘gap year’ between A-Levels and university, I went to see a locum doctor (who I’ve recast in my memory as John Larroquette) about some headaches I was having. He correctly assumed that I was worried that I had a brain tumour, assured me I didn’t, and attempted to get to the root of the problem. In the end, he decided it was the stress of not being sure about Uni, and prescribed a walk on the beach, where he suggested sitting for a while, looking out to sea, and deciding what I wanted to do. Needless to say, I didn’t do that, but the headaches eventually went away when I decided to skip university and carry in working (I eventually went six years later).

So, having gone from not knowing what to write, here I am writing far too much!

I should say that I do have faith in doctors, these three experiences have not made me hate going. I’ve always hated it!